Publications

2016
Walker V, Moise J, Staples K. Raven Recycling. In: Care, Cooperation and Activism in Canada's Northern Social Economy. First. Edmonton: The University of Alberta Press ; 2016. pp. 179-194. Publisher's VersionAbstract

People across Canada’s North have created vibrant community institutions to serve a wide range of social and economic needs. Neither state-driven nor profit-oriented, these organizations form a relatively under-studied third sector of the economy. Researchers from the Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada explore this sector through fifteen case studies, encompassing artistic, recreational, cultural, political, business, and economic development organizations that are crucial to the health and vitality of their communities. Care, Cooperation and Activism in Canada’s Northern Social Economy shows the innovative diversity and utter necessity of home-grown institutions in communities across Labrador, Nunatsiavut, Nunavik, Nunavut, Northwest Territories, and Yukon. Readers, researchers, and students interested in social economy, Aboriginal studies, and northern communities will find much to enjoy and value in this book.

Staples K, Walker V. Volunteer Benevoles Yukon. In: Care, Cooperation and Activism in Canada's Northern Social Economy. First. Edmonton: The University of Alberta Press ; 2016. pp. 195-214. Publisher's VersionAbstract

People across Canada’s North have created vibrant community institutions to serve a wide range of social and economic needs. Neither state-driven nor profit-oriented, these organizations form a relatively under-studied third sector of the economy. Researchers from the Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada explore this sector through fifteen case studies, encompassing artistic, recreational, cultural, political, business, and economic development organizations that are crucial to the health and vitality of their communities. Care, Cooperation and Activism in Canada’s Northern Social Economy shows the innovative diversity and utter necessity of home-grown institutions in communities across Labrador, Nunatsiavut, Nunavik, Nunavut, Northwest Territories, and Yukon. Readers, researchers, and students interested in social economy, Aboriginal studies, and northern communities will find much to enjoy and value in this book.

2015
Southcott C, Walker V. A Portrait of the Social Economy of Northern Canada. In: Northern Communities Working Together. First. Toronto: University of Toronto Press ; 2015. pp. 21-51. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The unique historical, economic, and social features of the Canadian North pose special challenges for the social economy – a sector that includes nonprofits, co-operatives, social enterprises, and community economic development organizations. Northern Communities Working Together highlights the innovative ways in which Northerners are using the social economy to meet their economic, social, and cultural challenges while increasing local control and capabilities. The contributors focus on the special challenges of the North and their impact on the scope of the social economy, including analyses of land claim organizations, hunter support programs, and Indigenous conceptions of the social economy.

A welcome resource for scholars and policy-makers studying any aspect of the Canadian North, Northern Communities Working Together is a major contribution to the literature on the social economy in Canada.

2011
McKitrick A, Wulff S, Acton H, Bussieres D, Miller N, Mook L, Walker V. The Academic/Practitioner Divide - Fact or Fiction? Reflections on the Role of the Lead Staff Personnel. In: Community-University Research Partnerships: Reflections on the Canadian Social Economy Experience. Victoria: University of Victoria ; 2011. pp. 205-236. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Edited by CCEDNet Research Committee Chair Peter Hall and Canadian Social Economy Hub Principal Investigator Ian MacPherson, this book explores lessons for community-university engagement by reflecting on the experiences, achievements and challenges of the Canadian Social Economy Research Partnerships (CSERP).

Between 2006 and 2012, the six regional nodes and the Hub conducted research on the social economy in Canada. This research entailed an unprecedented level of pan-Canadian experimentation within collaborative models of engagement, knowledge creation, sectoral (self) definition and policy development. While some parts of the social economy are professionalized and have formalized organizational structures that interact well with the university sector, important parts are emergent, informal and highly localized. Each of the CSERPs had to grapple with longstanding questions about building and sustaining community-university partnerships.

In Community-University Research Partnerships each of the nodes and the Hub describe their experiences in developing meaningful approaches to partnership-building and engagement and share insights on the process and challenges of forging (and maintaining) practitioner-university engagement.

Southcott C, Walker V, Natcher D, Alsop J, Jeans T, Falvo N. Researching the Social Economy in Canada's North: Reflections on the Node Partnerships and Processes. In: Community-University Research Partnerships: Reflections on the Canadian Social Economy Experience. Victoria: University of Victoria ; 2011. pp. 181-204. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Edited by CCEDNet Research Committee Chair Peter Hall and Canadian Social Economy Hub Principal Investigator Ian MacPherson, this book explores lessons for community-university engagement by reflecting on the experiences, achievements and challenges of the Canadian Social Economy Research Partnerships (CSERP).

Between 2006 and 2012, the six regional nodes and the Hub conducted research on the social economy in Canada. This research entailed an unprecedented level of pan-Canadian experimentation within collaborative models of engagement, knowledge creation, sectoral (self) definition and policy development. While some parts of the social economy are professionalized and have formalized organizational structures that interact well with the university sector, important parts are emergent, informal and highly localized. Each of the CSERPs had to grapple with longstanding questions about building and sustaining community-university partnerships.

In Community-University Research Partnerships each of the nodes and the Hub describe their experiences in developing meaningful approaches to partnership-building and engagement and share insights on the process and challenges of forging (and maintaining) practitioner-university engagement.

2009
Southcott C, Walker V. A Portrait of the Social Economy in Northern Canada. The Northern Review [Internet]. 2009;(30) :13-36. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Northern communities are currently facing many social and economic challenges. The non-profit, voluntary, and co-operative organizations involved in the social economy sector assist communities with these challenges by empowering them through the development of social and human capital. This article is part of an initial evaluation of the potential of the social economy to assist northern communities to deal with these challenges and develop this capacity. It offers an initial description of the state of the social economy in Canada's North through an examination of the results of a census of these organizations and a subsequent survey. The analysis shows that social economy organizations are particularly important to northern communities: they are more numerous and have more of an economic importance than in other regions of Canada. At the same time, these organizations are facing several important challenges that affect their ability to assist these communities such as a lack of funding, finding volunteers, retaining paid staff, and training.